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Goodbye Shine With Two Astringent Powerhouses


Looking for a way to reduce that shiny skin naturally? Roman Chamomile tea and Witch Hazel can come to the rescue. When combined, these two astringents become a powerful skin toner. Their astringent assets tighten pores which help to decrease oil secretion. Your skin will look less greasy.

It makes sense. Topically, Roman Chamomile is used for inflammation and as an antiseptic in ointments, creams, and gels to treat skin irritations. It is also used topically for wounds, burns, and eczema. You may smell a familiar scent with Roman Chamomile. It is used as a fragrance constituent in soaps, cosmetics, and perfumes.

Witch hazel is a liquid that is distilled from dried leaves, bark, and twigs of witch hazel plant. You may remember seeing it in your mom’s medicine cabinet in a white bottle. People use it for different reasons; but typically witch hazel is applied to the skin for itching, pain, swelling, inflammation, injury, and even acne.

How To Make Goodbye Shine Skin Toner:

  • 1 Roman Chamomile Tea Bag

  • ½ Cup or 4 ounces of witch hazel

  • 1 Cup or 8 ounces of Water

Steep 1 Roman Chamomile tea bag in 1 cup of boiling water for about 15 minutes. After it cools, remove the tea bag and pour the tea into a jar. Add ½ cup of witch hazel into the jar. Add the lid and shake. Apply to your skin with a cotton pad or you can spray it upon your face. It can be stored in refrigerator for up to four weeks.

Blessings, Herbal Farmwife

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#Astringent #Toner #RomanChamomile #WitchHazel #Greasyskin

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